The NFL and CNN spearhead the charge to destroy grammar

Readers of George Orwell will recall that one of the primary methods to destroy people’s mental and intellectual capacity that he described  in his novel ‘1984’ was the destruction of language itself. Government in Orwell’s  dystopian future either removes all meaning from words and concepts or inverts them completely to mean the opposite of their true meaning. Hence, ‘War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength.’

It would make sense that governments and their globalist  overlords in the NWO would desire to destroy grammar and logic along with word meanings and concepts. Hence, we witness today the rapid degeneration of grammar in the media, academia, and politics.

A couple of years ago, I began to notice a trend in the media that has become so prevalent now that it is not even commented upon: the disappearance of the paragraph. Go to any online news story published by a mainstream media outlet or even an independent blogger and you see a never-ending sequence of one or two sentence paragraphs. The paragraph form that has been taught to students for countless generations, and which is still taught in most schools today, has been abandoned entirely. We teachers have always taught students that an average paragraph length is four to five sentences with some being shorter and some being longer. Now, so-called journalists, writers and bloggers just tap the space key after every sentence or two. Articles and stories have no rhythm, cohesion or flow. Sure, some of them have good information and some are even entertaining to read, but the lack of the paragraph and transitional phrases severely reduces an article’s readability  and illustrates  the undisciplined writing that is so widespread in news media today. In turn, this undisciplined writing feeds the dumbing down of the population.

Another extremely disturbing trend is the replacement of the past tense, past perfect and even future tense with the all-encompassing present tense. Again, I noticed this for the first time a couple of years ago, especially amongst sports commentators. Now, I see it everywhere in the mass news media, including old reliable CNN.  For example, instead of saying the grammatically correct, “If he had caught that ball, they would have won the game,” the commentator will simply say, “If he catches that ball, they win.” What the hell is that? Is it simple laziness, stupidity, or something more conspiratorial? Likewise, when discussing the future, instead of writing, “Will he return next year?”, journalists now write, “Does he return?” And another will respond, “Yes, I think he returns next year,” instead of “I think he WILL return next year.”

We’re now taking our grammar cues from these guys?

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I find it hard to believe that so many writers and journalists have forgotten the past and future tense so suddenly. Perhaps they are being told by their editors to ‘simplify’ their language so as to hold on to as many viewers and readers as possible. Regardless, the result is the same- a massive evisceration of grammar to go along with the destruction of words and concepts.

Another one that bothers me is the use of the ‘historical present.’ If you are not familiar with that term, this is when a writer or narrator will consistently use the simple present tense when describing a sequence of historical events. Some of my favorite historical documentaries use this convenience , and it perplexes me and bothers me to no end. What is the point of it? I surmise that the editors and writers feel that using the present tense gives their documentary a more visceral feel and immediacy  than using the  past tense,  but is that really true? Does it sound better to say, “As the battle rages, many soldiers die,” instead of “As the battle raged on, many soldiers died”?  For me, the use of the present tense here does nothing to heighten the impact of the sentence.

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Another strange recent trend is taking about oneself using the second person. It’s weird enough to use the third person, but the second person sounds especially bizarre. Athletes again are at the forefront of this trend. A reporter asks, “How do you feel about losing the game today?” and the athlete responds, “Well, YOU just do the best YOU can,,,,,,YOU go out and fight hard, and hope YOU get the result YOU want, but today it didn’t work out….”

Huh?

These are not the idle gripes of a ‘Grammar Nazi.’ These are issues that everyone who speaks English, cares about education, and follows the workings of the NWO should be concerned about. Grammar matters, as it is the foundation for logic and rhetoric which are in turn the building blocks for the Quadrivium:

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2 thoughts on “The NFL and CNN spearhead the charge to destroy grammar”

  1. I find this in the propaganda on the “Terrorist War”. Is it Islamic State? I.S. ? I.S.L. ? Seems by keeping it confused it takes credibility from the organization as though they don’t exist as a group. Very similar to the state of confusion in the novel 1984 about who exactly they were at war with this moment. No matter, it’s a state of continuous war. Very similar to the description contained in the Plan for the 21st. Century. The plan we are all under now.

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